Spotlight on: Myrhofen, Austria

The village of Mayrhofen, located in the Zillertal of Tyrol in Austria, is a resort of considerable size that appeals to skiers from all over the world.  With Neilson Ski Holidays available to book online, you can take advantage of some great deals to ensure your ski holiday in the area is as affordable and as good a value as possible.

Perfect for intermediate skiers, Mayrhofen is also incredibly popular with beginners due to the reputable ski schools that operate in the area.  The folks at the ski school, Mayrhofen 3000, have made an excellent name for themselves, offering good value and lessons that won’t disappoint, ensuring that everyone comes away feeling more confident about their efforts on the slopes.

The snow-sure slopes mean that the resort is fortunate to have excellent conditions throughout the season.  Its 620 km of pistes make it the largest resort in the Ziller Valley, affording plenty of opportunity for on and off piste adventures.  The nearby Hintertux Glacier, often credited as being the largest glacier in the world, also provides some great opportunities for more advanced skiers, even out of the main ski season.

For freestyle skiers and snowboarders, a break in Mayrhofen will give you access to the second largest terrain park in Europe, giving you plenty of opportunity to show off your moves.  Although the village has grown somewhat over recent years to cater to the growing tourism trade, its traditional aspects remain the same, providing a charming and quintessentially Austrian atmosphere that appeals to its many visitors.

Once you have enjoyed your day on the slopes, you can be safe in the knowledge that the après-ski facilities and nightlife won’t disappoint.  If you’re considering a holiday here, consider a week in April to coincide with the ‘snowbombing’ event, combining skiing with some awesome live music and a party atmosphere.

If you’re after a memorable holiday, full of fun and vibrancy, book a Neilson Ski Holiday at this buzzing resort.

Innsbruck, Austria

Innsbruck, Austria, Nestled in the Tyrolean Alps

          After a breathtakingly beautiful train ride through the Dolomites of Northern Italy, I crossed the border into Austria and arrived in Innsbruck on a late Sunday afternoon in June.  Innsbruck, site of the 1964 and 1976 Winter Olympics, is a lovely small city nestled in the Tyrolean Alps on the Inn River.  ‘Brucke’ means bridge in German, thus Innsbruck means ‘bridge over the Inn River’.  In no time I found a nice pension (Pension Stoi) not far from the train station for the equivalent of $58, including private bath.  Innsbruck is an easily walkable ‘town’ and after a quick rest, I was on my way to the Altstadt or Old Town along the river where I would soon be treated to a surprise.

Innsbruck, Austria

Innsbruck, Austria

Tyrolean Alps Surrounding Innsbruck on the Inn River

Tyrolean Alps Surrounding Innsbruck on the Inn River

The Old Town

          The colorful Baroque architecture of Innsbruck dates back to the Hapsburg Dynasty and includes two special churches, Dom St. Jakob and the Hofkirche, as well as the Hofburg or summer home of the Hapsburgs.  Perhaps the most famous sight in the Altstadt is the Golden Roof, a gold balcony honoring Hapsburg Emperor, Maximilian I.  The Ambras Castle in the hills above Innsbruck will have to wait until my next visit.  Built by Archduke Ferdinand II, it houses many valuable collections of art and other memorabilia from the Hapsburg Dynasty.

The Golden Roof, Old Town, Innsbruck

The Golden Roof, Old Town, Innsbruck

Marching Band, Old Town, Innsbruck

Marching Band, Old Town, Innsbruck

A Special Treat 

          As I was taking in the splendor of these surroundings, mingling with the friendly, local people and not knowing where to look next, I heard the faint sound of a large brass band off in the distance.  It suddenly grew louder as the parade rounded a corner and entered the main street of the Altstadt, heading right in my direction.  Soon the main square was filled with a marching band and dancers of all ages, each in traditional folk dress, regaling the delighted tourists with about 45 minutes of entertainment before marching off again into the distance.  It was one of those treats that all travelers hope for, a glimpse of local culture, and it will forever be one of the highlights of my world travels.  Innsbruck was like being at Disneyland, except it was the real thing!

You’ll Enjoy This Video of a Tyrolean Marching Band and Dancers